Black Chip Collective | 5 Terms That Aren't Video Production Expressions But Should Be
There are things, quite a number of things, that production people all know about but haven't necessarily given names. Let's expand the industry vocabulary.
video production, editing, post production, tv, filmmaking
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5 Terms That Aren’t Video Production Expressions But Should Be

Mar 01 2017

5 Terms That Aren’t Video Production Expressions But Should Be

There are things, quite a number of things, that production people all know about but haven’t necessarily given names. No reason to keep it that way.

 

Blank Tie Event

For those times when you’re shooting at a fancy event or in a well dressed corporate office. You want to dress fit the situation, but most of all you want to be invisible. Black slacks and a white dress shirt work great, regardless of gender. Dress like a waiter, you’ll be fine.

Yes, it’s a play on black tie event.

 

 

Industry Messiah 

A recent film school graduate who is absolutely sure they know better than people who have been in the industry for decades. Not to say that people new to the industry can’t have great new ideas or know of new software or hardware advancements that old dogs might not be clued in to- Industry Messiah specifically refers to novices who smugly contradict the methods of experienced and talented professionals. Don’t be that guy. No one likes that guy.

 

 

TV Week

A week where you work over 100 hours. Named for obvious reasons. Not to dissuade anyone with TV production ambitions, but TV folks tend to work very long hours, more often than even advertising and film crew.

You can go home when we get this shot of a dog doing a backflip onto a train AND NOT BEFORE.

 

 

Downbeat Terrorist

An editor who cuts a short form video, usually a highlight reel, and puts cuts directly on the first beat of each measure of the music. It’s not the worst thing in the world, certainly better than not matching the pacing to the rhythm of the music at all, but it becomes extremely predictable and boring, especially if it’s longer than 30 seconds. A better method is to use different musical cues to inspire the pace and method of the cuts but not to allow the music to always dictate exactly where cuts go.

 

 

Jerk

Someone who intentionally strikes a light when you’re looking right at it.

Thanks a lot, KEVIN

 

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